What is GLOBAL COMPETENCe?

Global Competence is more then having having an understanding of global issues and history. Beyond facts and isolated topics, globally competent students see the world for its connectedness; as a system. Students develop global competence by investigating issues of global significance, recognizing multiple perspectives, communicating their views effectively and taking action. Whether tackling topics and issues at the local or global level, students curiosity is peaked and they can be moved to taking action when challenged with classroom relevant and authentic opportunities examined through the lens of our pedagogy.  

Globally competent students are able to: 1. Investigate the world beyond their immediate environment 2. Recognize perspectives and articulate such perspectives respectfully 3. Communicate ideas effectively with diverse audiences, across geographic, linguistic, ideological and cultural boundaries 4. Take action to improve conditions in their own world and globally

Globally competent students are able to:

1. Investigate the world beyond their immediate environment

2. Recognize perspectives and articulate such perspectives respectfully

3. Communicate ideas effectively with diverse audiences, across geographic, linguistic, ideological and cultural boundaries

4. Take action to improve conditions in their own world and globally

 

URGENCY FOR GLOBAL COMPETENCY AND INNOVATIVE EDUCATION

There is a justifiable sense of urgency for global competency and innovative education. During the Wise Summit, Tony Wagner, cofounder of the Change Leadership Group at Harvard, explains what we need to be teaching students to ensure their 21st Century success. He mentions other organizations, universities, businesses that are changing their systems of education and hiring to meet a quickly-changing world. His speech emphasizes two reoccurring themes: global competency and innovation. This is only one example that exemplifies our need to bring students up with creativity, innovation, global literacy, cross-sector and cross-cultural collaboration, and lessons in empathy. Click on the image below to view Wagner's powerful presentation.

  In the video above, Tony Wagner mentions Google and the 15% of employees who do not have a college education. Although we highly encourage our students to attend college, we realize that the world is changing. Businesses and now many universities are looking for globally-minded students who are able to problem solve and innovate. At times this means, students need to have the skills to learn how to apply the standards they must master. They must be placed in situations to fail, in which there is no right answer, rather a problem that requires an uncertain solution. In addition, they MUST have cross-cultural and global interaction. Students are certain to work with diverse, global populations and must have the acceptance, empathy, professional and collaborative skills to do so. An example of this can be found on the Google Careers page. 

 

In the video above, Tony Wagner mentions Google and the 15% of employees who do not have a college education. Although we highly encourage our students to attend college, we realize that the world is changing. Businesses and now many universities are looking for globally-minded students who are able to problem solve and innovate. At times this means, students need to have the skills to learn how to apply the standards they must master. They must be placed in situations to fail, in which there is no right answer, rather a problem that requires an uncertain solution. In addition, they MUST have cross-cultural and global interaction. Students are certain to work with diverse, global populations and must have the acceptance, empathy, professional and collaborative skills to do so. An example of this can be found on the Google Careers page.