East Campus Designs

For more examples of both past and present East Campus Global Designs visit: http://www.eastcampusmuscatine.org/

Media Production:

“Creative uses of technology require us to go beyond ‘functional fixedness’ (the manner in which the ideas we hold about an object’s function can inhibit our ability to use the object for a different function) so that we can innovatively repurpose existing tools toward pedagogical ends.” Unfortunately, often technology is viewed as an automated system, and many believe its very nature limits productive social interactions and constructs barriers. But, if utilized in an innovative manner, technology can be used to fuse humanity rather than to divide it.

If we want to nurture students who will grow into lifelong learners, into self-directed seekers, into the kind of adults who are morally responsible even when someone is not looking, then we need to give them opportunities to practice making choices and reflecting on the outcomes. This is done through design-based instruction/projects. Similar to projects within a business, students are taught to assume the role of project manager. They must manage team members, checkpoints, and time. In this way students are better able to understand the importance of their learning and how it applies to the real world.


One of our primary objectives with our students is to not only foster connections with the school district, but our community as well. We believe strongly in providing our students opportunities to make connections with the Muscatine community while also highlighting and enhancing public awareness for community events. When technology is used in a design-based environment, it becomes a tool for expression and authentic application - audience expands from the classroom community to a global community. This shift encourages content and standards be taught with purpose to complete an end product. With real-world relevance within classrooms that encourage inquiry and investigation, students are provided a business model with collaboration and organization, communication, and innovation. Our media program is yet another example of the ways in which our classrooms have been transformed into vehicles for public service where empowerment through real-world action is developed and fueled.

Examples of student work as it relates to both the local and global community: 

What is MCSA and what do we do? MCSA provides temporary shelter, basic health care, educational and vocational support services for those in need in Muscatine County while working to reduce these needs through long-term social change in the community.

Verizon Innovative App Challenge 2013 The idea is to build a mobile website or app that will help people to shop for or find "The Right Meal" for them. The idea for this project is simple, however the viability and powerful implications for such an app are endless.

We're in our 10th year of fighting heart disease in women, but the fight is far from over. Women, it's time to stand together in the fight for our lives. Because heart disease is our No. 1 killer, affecting more women than men. Because it's more deadly than all for of cancer combined.

Click here for more East Campus student media work

Cultivating a Healthy Community: 

  Such documentaries as A Place at the Table, bring awareness to the issues the U.S. faces with hunger and food insecurity, meaning that throughout the year a household will go without adequate food due to lack of money and resources. Therefore, in an attempt to stretch a dollar, families purchase energy-dense foods to stave off hunger. Unfortunately, the cheaper the food the more unhealthy the food. Cheap foods come with a medical and monetary price tag. The foods that are keeping many U.S. citizens alive are actually killing them in other ways such as heart disease, anxiety, diabetes, etc.  In addition to food insecurity is simply the unhealthy way Americans eat. Many families lack the time to prepare an adequate, healthy meal; therefore, they resort to quick meals with a lot of preservatives. The Seeds program is by no means a solution to food insecurity and unhealthy eating, but it is a step. Seeds is a program designed and implemented by high school students, with the help of experts, to teach families how to plant, grow, and maintain a garden as well as how to harvest, clean, and prepare the produce from the garden. The goal is to encourage families to raise their children with healthy cycles while serving as role models for many us who need to do the same. This requires a great deal of research, writing, promotion, sociology, community connections, health literacy, math, design, and the list goes on. Working in collaboration with Monsanto and the Muscatine Food Pantry, East Campus and MHS students will document the building, planting, and harvesting of the three gardens they will be supporting this year with each of the family's full investment, as the families make key choices about their own personal gardens. They choose the location, the types of vegetables they would like to grow, and they also give back. During the season, they will donate 10% of their produce to be sold at farmers markets so the money can be used to invest in an additional family's garden next year. In essence, the students are creating a micro nonprofit with the hope that others will join their collaborative efforts in the future.

 

Such documentaries as A Place at the Table, bring awareness to the issues the U.S. faces with hunger and food insecurity, meaning that throughout the year a household will go without adequate food due to lack of money and resources. Therefore, in an attempt to stretch a dollar, families purchase energy-dense foods to stave off hunger. Unfortunately, the cheaper the food the more unhealthy the food. Cheap foods come with a medical and monetary price tag. The foods that are keeping many U.S. citizens alive are actually killing them in other ways such as heart disease, anxiety, diabetes, etc. 

In addition to food insecurity is simply the unhealthy way Americans eat. Many families lack the time to prepare an adequate, healthy meal; therefore, they resort to quick meals with a lot of preservatives.

The Seeds program is by no means a solution to food insecurity and unhealthy eating, but it is a step. Seeds is a program designed and implemented by high school students, with the help of experts, to teach families how to plant, grow, and maintain a garden as well as how to harvest, clean, and prepare the produce from the garden. The goal is to encourage families to raise their children with healthy cycles while serving as role models for many us who need to do the same. This requires a great deal of research, writing, promotion, sociology, community connections, health literacy, math, design, and the list goes on.

Working in collaboration with Monsanto and the Muscatine Food Pantry, East Campus and MHS students will document the building, planting, and harvesting of the three gardens they will be supporting this year with each of the family's full investment, as the families make key choices about their own personal gardens. They choose the location, the types of vegetables they would like to grow, and they also give back. During the season, they will donate 10% of their produce to be sold at farmers markets so the money can be used to invest in an additional family's garden next year. In essence, the students are creating a micro nonprofit with the hope that others will join their collaborative efforts in the future.

See Below: Download TGC Understanding By Design Unit Lesson Plan, original research and guiding questions ideas for blog entries, and personal digital learning environment inventory for East Campus.