Global Education is

Whereas content once took center stage in the classroom, the 21st century has presented us with new and pressing issues requiring us to teach differently, exposing our students to multiple forms of innovation, both tangible and abstract. More importantly, it is imperative in a highly globalized world to teach our students how to interact and collaborate with multiple cultures. This requires we rethink our pedagogy and teach students the skills necessary to excel in a contemporary, globally-driven world. Global education is synonymous with Human-Centered Design. Each involves interdisciplinary approaches to education, working in unison to solve a social problem both locally or globally. The emphasis is not solely on using curriculum to solve a problem; rather it is gaining cultural empathy for a group of people to better design a solution that meets the group’s needs and wants.

 

What needs to happen:

1.    We must internalize this sense of urgency to teach differently. We need to replace traditional curricula with interactive, design-based methods, a fusion between curriculum and real world issues. Students must be given authentic options to collaborate with others, as collaboration confined to the classroom limits student potential and is unrealistic.

2.    We must provide our students opportunities to innovate within the context of a purposeful social problem. And we must teach our students how to become comfortable with failure during the process. We can no longer present students with classroom simulations and expect they will gain ample skills. Students must experience authentic problems, with authentic audiences, authentic deadlines, and authentic consequences. It is not what students know but what they can do with that knowledge. In the 21st century, it is necessary to be a problem solver.

3.    We must break out of our own realm of comfort to collaborate across disciplines, recognizing this takes time but highly enhances the academic experience. We must help our students to see that the world does not operate in compartments. English works with math, science with social studies; they cannot function without the other.

4.    We must realize the world is fueled by emotion and social connections. Removing this from academia is unjust and creates climates of apathy, lacking the compassion needed for effective collaboration. Teaching students empathy will transform the way they learn and interact with the world. 

BELOW: Video recorded from March 17th Blog Entry

"The best children books are crayon covered with finger-stained and tattered pages. These are the books that have been loved."

Today we toured a local public school in Tbilisi, Georgia-School No. 165. Cracked, with chipping paint on the walls and rough wooden floors held down in places by bits of tape. Public schools in many parts of the word (and increasingly in the United States) are not viewed in the same light and standing as many private institutions. Click here to read on... 

List of what you will find in the pages of this site:

  • Why Global Competence Matters-Discussing the urgency and rationale for addressing global competence in schools today.
  • Global Education Resources provides a list of links, opportunities and documents for educators that I have come across this past year through TGC. I will work to continuously update these resources. 
  • The Global Designs Blog highlights the connections, conversations and essential questions I explored throughout my time with TGC. 
  • Global Opportunities for Teachers and Students includes links to the US Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs site highlighting exchange programs for students and fellowship opportunities for secondary teachers and administrators. 

What is GLOBAL COMPETENCe?

Global Competence is more then having having an understanding of global issues and history. Beyond facts and isolated topics, globally competent students see the world for its connectedness; as a system. Students develop global competence by investigating issues of global significance, recognizing multiple perspectives, communicating their views effectively and taking action. Whether tackling topics and issues at the local or global level, students curiosity is peaked and they can be moved to taking action when challenged with classroom relevant and authentic opportunities examined through the lens of our pedagogy.  

Globally competent students are able to: 1. Investigate the world beyond their immediate environment 2. Recognize perspectives and articulate such perspectives respectfully 3. Communicate ideas effectively with diverse audiences, across geographic, linguistic, ideological and cultural boundaries 4. Take action to improve conditions in their own world and globally

Globally competent students are able to:

1. Investigate the world beyond their immediate environment

2. Recognize perspectives and articulate such perspectives respectfully

3. Communicate ideas effectively with diverse audiences, across geographic, linguistic, ideological and cultural boundaries

4. Take action to improve conditions in their own world and globally

 

URGENCY FOR GLOBAL COMPETENCY AND INNOVATIVE EDUCATION

There is a justifiable sense of urgency for global competency and innovative education. During the Wise Summit, Tony Wagner, cofounder of the Change Leadership Group at Harvard, explains what we need to be teaching students to ensure their 21st Century success. He mentions other organizations, universities, businesses that are changing their systems of education and hiring to meet a quickly-changing world. His speech emphasizes two reoccurring themes: global competency and innovation. This is only one example that exemplifies our need to bring students up with creativity, innovation, global literacy, cross-sector and cross-cultural collaboration, and lessons in empathy. Click on the image below to view Wagner's powerful presentation.

  In the video above, Tony Wagner mentions Google and the 15% of employees who do not have a college education. Although we highly encourage our students to attend college, we realize that the world is changing. Businesses and now many universities are looking for globally-minded students who are able to problem solve and innovate. At times this means, students need to have the skills to learn how to apply the standards they must master. They must be placed in situations to fail, in which there is no right answer, rather a problem that requires an uncertain solution. In addition, they MUST have cross-cultural and global interaction. Students are certain to work with diverse, global populations and must have the acceptance, empathy, professional and collaborative skills to do so. An example of this can be found on the Google Careers page. 

 

In the video above, Tony Wagner mentions Google and the 15% of employees who do not have a college education. Although we highly encourage our students to attend college, we realize that the world is changing. Businesses and now many universities are looking for globally-minded students who are able to problem solve and innovate. At times this means, students need to have the skills to learn how to apply the standards they must master. They must be placed in situations to fail, in which there is no right answer, rather a problem that requires an uncertain solution. In addition, they MUST have cross-cultural and global interaction. Students are certain to work with diverse, global populations and must have the acceptance, empathy, professional and collaborative skills to do so. An example of this can be found on the Google Careers page. 

Global Education Assessment Tools

As a part of the TGC program, various rubrics, documents and checklists were provided to help guide the conversations I had with my teaching peers and administrators while also providing the language and relevant data I should be collecting to bring my global curriculum to life. Listed below are the resources that I found most relevant and helpful. Please feel free to take and use in for your own classroom designs.

The global education tools and assessments provided on this page include: (In the order they appear on the page)

  • The Global Education Checklist
  • Global Competencies-CCSSO: Asia Society
  • OXFAM Global Citizenship Audit
  • Checklist for Teaching Global Competence
  • Technology Integration Matrix 
  • Teachers for Global Classrooms Tools and Resources

The Global Education Checklist

A great starting point and tool for identifying global education gaps in current instruction and the school environment. I incorporated this at the beginning of our school year as a part of professional development with our teachers. Insightful conversation and and evolving ideas ensued. 

 

BELOW ARE GLOBAL COMPETENCIES FOUND IN VERONICA MANSILLA & ANTHONY JACKSON'S PREPARING OUR YOUTH TO ENGAGE THE WORLD  PUBLISHED BY THE ASIA SOCIETY.  

At East Campus, we believe all education should "Identify and create opportunities for personal or collaborative action to address situations, events, issues, or phenomena in ways that improve conditions" as stated below. The competencies align with Wagner's message above and the d.school's innovative movement highlighted below. Accompanying most of the competencies are examples of socially innovative projects, conferences, etc. we have participated in and created.  

Asia Society Checklist for Teaching Global Competencies

Asia Society Checklist for Teaching Global Competencies

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GLobal Citizenship in the Whole School-Global Citizenship Audit

An audit is a practical starting point. The link below sets out some key areas for consideration. It can be adapted to suit your own educational circumstances, so you may want to add your own points. 

Checklist for Teaching Global Competence

Provides teachers with guiding questions as they develop their activities and lessons towards a more globally focused classroom. 

  Click here: Checklist for Teaching Global Competence

 

Click here: Checklist for Teaching Global Competence

Technology Integration Matrix

While not directly tied to Global Education, I have utilized this tool to direct my teachers towards a more engaging approach in using technology in their pedagogy. The beauty/power in the matrix is in the video clips that accompany each of the matrix categories. The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) illustrates how teachers can use technology to enhance learning for K-12 students. The TIM incorporates five interdependent characteristics of meaningful learning environments: active, constructive, goal directed (i.e., reflective), authentic, and collaborative (Jonassen, Howland, Moore, & Marra, 2003). The TIM associates five levels of technology integration (i.e., entry, adoption, adaption, infusion, and transformation) with each of the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments. Together, the five levels of technology integration and the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments create a matrix of 25 cells as illustrated below. 

TEachers for Global Classrooms (TGC): TOols and Resources

  • Web tools to facilitate international communication
  • Initiatives and organizations that support collaboration between global classrooms
  • Lesson plans and student resources with an international focus


For Students:

"Life is either a great adventure, or nothing." ~Helen Keller

Student International Exchange Program

FOR Teachers:

TEACHERS For Global Classrooms

The Teachers for Global Classrooms Program (TGC) is a professional development opportunity for middle and high school teachers from the United States, with the goal of providing teachers with the skills and experience to promote global education in their classrooms and schools.

The TGC program provides teachers with:

• An online course that helps US teachers to integrate globalized learning objectives into their curriculum
• A Global Education symposium in Washington
• A two – three week international field experience
• A chance to apply for alumni grant funding for international projects for their school

Participants are selected through a national, open competition.

Eligible applicants must be:
• Full-time secondary-level (middle or high school) teachers with five or more years of classroom experience
• U.S. citizens currently residing in the U.S.

TGC is a program of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) administered by IREX.
Please visit the program page for further information:http://www.irex.org/tgc

Catherine Miller Explorer Award (Muscatine teachers only)

Where in the World Do You Want to Go?

Attention all full-time Muscatine Community School District and Saints Mary and Mathias Catholic School K-12 teachers, for the 2014-2015 school year, the Stanley Foundation announces:

Enter the drawing for the Catherine Miller Explorer Awards.

Any full-time (as of September 1, 2014) K-12 classroom teacher at Saints Mary and Mathias Catholic School or within the Muscatine Community School District may enter the drawing that will determine ten finalists. Deadline for entry is midnight, September 8, 2014. Only one entry allowed per person.

All entries will be included in a random drawing to select ten finalists. Those ten finalists will complete an application that will be considered by an independent panel of four judges. Two teachers will then be selected for the study trips.

Only ten teachers will be invited to apply for the awards, but everyone has the same chance of receiving an invitation!

Fulbright Distinguished awards in Teaching

The Fulbright Distinguished Awards in Teaching Program

The Fulbright Distinguished Awards in Teaching Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and is administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE). It seeks to promote mutual understanding among teachers, their schools and communities in the U.S. and abroad by:

  • Building teachers’ and students’ global competence
  • Sharing of best educational practices internationally

Participants in this three to six month program are based at university-level schools of education. They take courses, lead master classes and seminars, visit local schools, collaborate with each other online and in person, and complete an inquiry project of their own design.

 


East Campus Designs

For more examples of both past and present East Campus Global Designs visit: http://www.eastcampusmuscatine.org/

Media Production:

“Creative uses of technology require us to go beyond ‘functional fixedness’ (the manner in which the ideas we hold about an object’s function can inhibit our ability to use the object for a different function) so that we can innovatively repurpose existing tools toward pedagogical ends.” Unfortunately, often technology is viewed as an automated system, and many believe its very nature limits productive social interactions and constructs barriers. But, if utilized in an innovative manner, technology can be used to fuse humanity rather than to divide it.

If we want to nurture students who will grow into lifelong learners, into self-directed seekers, into the kind of adults who are morally responsible even when someone is not looking, then we need to give them opportunities to practice making choices and reflecting on the outcomes. This is done through design-based instruction/projects. Similar to projects within a business, students are taught to assume the role of project manager. They must manage team members, checkpoints, and time. In this way students are better able to understand the importance of their learning and how it applies to the real world.


One of our primary objectives with our students is to not only foster connections with the school district, but our community as well. We believe strongly in providing our students opportunities to make connections with the Muscatine community while also highlighting and enhancing public awareness for community events. When technology is used in a design-based environment, it becomes a tool for expression and authentic application - audience expands from the classroom community to a global community. This shift encourages content and standards be taught with purpose to complete an end product. With real-world relevance within classrooms that encourage inquiry and investigation, students are provided a business model with collaboration and organization, communication, and innovation. Our media program is yet another example of the ways in which our classrooms have been transformed into vehicles for public service where empowerment through real-world action is developed and fueled.

Examples of student work as it relates to both the local and global community: 

What is MCSA and what do we do? MCSA provides temporary shelter, basic health care, educational and vocational support services for those in need in Muscatine County while working to reduce these needs through long-term social change in the community.

Verizon Innovative App Challenge 2013 The idea is to build a mobile website or app that will help people to shop for or find "The Right Meal" for them. The idea for this project is simple, however the viability and powerful implications for such an app are endless.

We're in our 10th year of fighting heart disease in women, but the fight is far from over. Women, it's time to stand together in the fight for our lives. Because heart disease is our No. 1 killer, affecting more women than men. Because it's more deadly than all for of cancer combined.

Click here for more East Campus student media work

Cultivating a Healthy Community: 

  Such documentaries as A Place at the Table, bring awareness to the issues the U.S. faces with hunger and food insecurity, meaning that throughout the year a household will go without adequate food due to lack of money and resources. Therefore, in an attempt to stretch a dollar, families purchase energy-dense foods to stave off hunger. Unfortunately, the cheaper the food the more unhealthy the food. Cheap foods come with a medical and monetary price tag. The foods that are keeping many U.S. citizens alive are actually killing them in other ways such as heart disease, anxiety, diabetes, etc.  In addition to food insecurity is simply the unhealthy way Americans eat. Many families lack the time to prepare an adequate, healthy meal; therefore, they resort to quick meals with a lot of preservatives. The Seeds program is by no means a solution to food insecurity and unhealthy eating, but it is a step. Seeds is a program designed and implemented by high school students, with the help of experts, to teach families how to plant, grow, and maintain a garden as well as how to harvest, clean, and prepare the produce from the garden. The goal is to encourage families to raise their children with healthy cycles while serving as role models for many us who need to do the same. This requires a great deal of research, writing, promotion, sociology, community connections, health literacy, math, design, and the list goes on. Working in collaboration with Monsanto and the Muscatine Food Pantry, East Campus and MHS students will document the building, planting, and harvesting of the three gardens they will be supporting this year with each of the family's full investment, as the families make key choices about their own personal gardens. They choose the location, the types of vegetables they would like to grow, and they also give back. During the season, they will donate 10% of their produce to be sold at farmers markets so the money can be used to invest in an additional family's garden next year. In essence, the students are creating a micro nonprofit with the hope that others will join their collaborative efforts in the future.

 

Such documentaries as A Place at the Table, bring awareness to the issues the U.S. faces with hunger and food insecurity, meaning that throughout the year a household will go without adequate food due to lack of money and resources. Therefore, in an attempt to stretch a dollar, families purchase energy-dense foods to stave off hunger. Unfortunately, the cheaper the food the more unhealthy the food. Cheap foods come with a medical and monetary price tag. The foods that are keeping many U.S. citizens alive are actually killing them in other ways such as heart disease, anxiety, diabetes, etc. 

In addition to food insecurity is simply the unhealthy way Americans eat. Many families lack the time to prepare an adequate, healthy meal; therefore, they resort to quick meals with a lot of preservatives.

The Seeds program is by no means a solution to food insecurity and unhealthy eating, but it is a step. Seeds is a program designed and implemented by high school students, with the help of experts, to teach families how to plant, grow, and maintain a garden as well as how to harvest, clean, and prepare the produce from the garden. The goal is to encourage families to raise their children with healthy cycles while serving as role models for many us who need to do the same. This requires a great deal of research, writing, promotion, sociology, community connections, health literacy, math, design, and the list goes on.

Working in collaboration with Monsanto and the Muscatine Food Pantry, East Campus and MHS students will document the building, planting, and harvesting of the three gardens they will be supporting this year with each of the family's full investment, as the families make key choices about their own personal gardens. They choose the location, the types of vegetables they would like to grow, and they also give back. During the season, they will donate 10% of their produce to be sold at farmers markets so the money can be used to invest in an additional family's garden next year. In essence, the students are creating a micro nonprofit with the hope that others will join their collaborative efforts in the future.

See Below: Download TGC Understanding By Design Unit Lesson Plan, original research and guiding questions ideas for blog entries, and personal digital learning environment inventory for East Campus.